Sunday, October 19, 2014

Nightscape Press Halloween 2014 50% Off Sale


Mark your calendars: October 24th, 2014 through the end of Halloween (October 31st, 2014) ALL Nightscape Press books (electronic and trade paperback) will be on sale for 50% off retail!  This will be a great time to stock up on some books!  They make great presents: Christmas, Birthday, or no occasion at all!  Choose from Stoker-nominated and Stoker-winning books as well as books whose proceeds go directly to charity!  Don't miss it!  Click on the image above or follow this link: Nightscape Press Halloween Sale

(Note: Sales prices won't be valid until 10/24/14)

Friday, October 17, 2014

Pre-Order Fantasy For Good!



Release Date: 12/9/2014 in Trade Paperback and all eBook formats! Pre-Order Now!

Paperback Pre-Order Link: Trade Paperback Pre-Order on the Nightscape Press Web Store

Kindle Pre-Order Link: Amazon Kindle Pre-Order

eBook (MOBI/EPUB/PDF) Pre-Order Link: eBook Pre-Order Link on the Nightscape Press Web Store

From Sword and Sorcery to Paranormal Romance, from Weird Fiction to Fairy Tales, Fantasy For Good presents a wide range of exciting short fiction to accommodate every taste. In this collection of thirty stories, legendary authors (including NYT Bestsellers and World Fantasy Award winners) and great new up-and-comers in the genre spin tales of magic and mayhem.

Featuring brand new fiction from Piers Anthony, Michael Moorcock, Carrie Vaughn, Kelley Armstrong, Alan Dean Foster, Katharine Kerr, David Farland, Jane Lindskold, Nnedi Okorafor, Todd McCaffrey and many more, alongside classic tales from George R.R. Martin, Jay Lake, Kevin J.                                                                                                               Anderson & Rebecca Moesta, and Neil Gaiman.

Fantasy For Good also includes a classic tale by master novelist, Roger Zelazny, author of the Nine Princes in Amber, who passed away in 1995 after a battle with colorectal cancer. His son, Trent, provides a moving introduction.

All proceeds from the sale of this anthology go directly to The Colon Cancer Alliance, a charity dedicated to the prevention of this deadly disease, as well as funding research and supporting patients who suffer from it.

Table of Contents:
Horseman, Pass By – An Introduction — Trent Zelazny
The Edge of Magic — Henry Szabranski
Annual Dues — Ken Scholes
The Kitsune’s Nine Tales — Kelley Armstrong
Elroy Wooden Sword — S.C. Hayden
In the Lost Lands — George R.R. Martin
Worms Rising From the Dirt — David Farland
Snow Wolf and Evening Wolf — James Enge
Knight’s Errand — Jane Lindskold
Languid in Rose — Frances Silversmith
Green They Were, and Golden-Eyed — Alan Dean Foster
Golden — Todd McCaffrey
Mountain Spirit — Piers Anthony
Moon Glass — Megan Moore
The George Business — Roger Zelazny
Only the End of the World Again — Neil Gaiman
Lenora of the Low — Marina J. Lostetter
Trufan Fever — Katharine Kerr
Undying Love — Jackie Kessler
Dancing With the Mouse King — Carrie Vaughn
Showlogo — Nnedi Okorafor
The Bluest Hour — Jaye Wells
Pandal Food — Samit Basu
Loincloth — Kevin J Anderson and Rebecca Moesta
Man of Water — Kyle Aisteach
Bones of a Righteous Man — Michael Ezell
Time’s Mistress — Steven Savile
Little Pig, Berry Brown and the Hard Moon — Jay Lake
The Grenade Garden — Michael Moorcock
Sand and Teeth — Carmen Tudor
The Seas of Heaven — David Parish-Whittaker

Thursday, October 16, 2014

The Misadventures of Hobart Hucklebuck| Author Interview with Stan Swanson


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Thanks for joining my stop on this fun tour!! I have an interview with the author, Stan Swanson.  Check out details about the book and then check out the interview!


The Misadentures of Hobart Hucklebuck by Stan Swanson is a middle grade fantasy and the tour runs October 13-17 with reviews & author interviews. Check out the tour page for the full schedule.
The book is aimed at ages 8-12 but as an adult I found it wildly entertaining and a load of fun!


Hobart Hucklebuck
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The Misadventures of Hobart Hucklebuck
Things are not as they should be in Pennywhistle. Enchanted toasters are not toasting, enchanted sprinklers are not sprinkling and Hobart Hucklebuck's origami messenger birds are suddenly attacking him. Someone seems to be draining the power from all of the enchanted items in the village. But who could it be and why have they implicated Hobart's grandfather? The Misadventures of Hobart Hucklebuck: Magic & Mayhem follows Hobart and his friends, Specks Spacklethack and Rosie Rumpleskirt, as they try to solve this mystery and free Hobart's grandfather from the Tower of Tribulation on Mumblemonk Mountain. The trio's investigation into the mysterious happenings on Druid Lane gets them into hot water more than once and ultimately brings them dangerously close to disaster not only for themselves, but the entire village of Pennywhistle.


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Author Interview with Stan Swanson:


Is Hobart you as a young child or where did you pull your inspiration for him from?
I didn’t really model Hobart after me as a child although I suspect there is either some part of myself or friends I knew when I was growing up in each of my characters. I feel an author has to know their characters very well and our childhoods have very deep impacts on our lives as we grow older. But if we are lucky, we all keep part of that childhood tucked away in our memories. I try to bring back those memories of growing up with my siblings as well as my friends in all of my writing.

What do you consider the distinction between middle grades/YA and what interests you about writing in that space?
Sometimes there is a fine line between writing for middle grades and young adult. And, of course, there are middle graders who can read and understand young adult writing without a problem, so one also has to consider reading levels and those don’t always correspond with grade levels. I write young adult and middle grade novels and enjoy both. I have also written picture books and novels strictly for adults, so I’ve covered a lot of territory. And, of course, the nice thing about middle grade and young adult novels is that there are many adults who also enjoy reading these genres.

What's one thing that's surprised you writing for kids?
I guess what initially surprised me the most was that I could do it. In fact, writing for middle graders is one of my favorite things to do. And don’t let anyone tell you it’s easier to write for the younger generations than it is for adults. Writing is hard work no matter who you are writing for or what you are writing about. (My wife says I do well with writing for middle graders as I still have the mind of a 10-year-old. I’m still not sure if she is kidding or not...)

Do you have any kids to beta read for you?
I really don’t use beta readers for anything I write. I will, however, occasionally ask a neighbor or a one of my grandchildren if a phrase is still popular so I don’t get too “out-of-date.”

Who's your favorite character in the book?
I enjoy all of my characters whether they are a major character or just someone who shows up a couple of times. I feel like I know them all and try to make each of them as “real” as possible.

What's next for Hobart/any other middle grades/YA books in the works?
The second book in The Misadventures of Hobart Hucklebuck is already with the fine people at Curiosity Quills although we haven’t settled on a release date. I am also currently doing the outline for the third book in the series. I am also a big fan of steampunk and am slowly working my way through two steampunk manuscripts for young adults.

If The Misadventures of Hobart Hucklebuck was made into a movie, who would you see playing Hobart?
I don’t really see The Misadventures of Hobart Hucklebuck as a movie, but I think it would make a great animated film. LOL.



AUTHOR BIO:
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Stan Swanson is a Bram Stoker award finalist and author of eight books including Horror High School: Return of the Loving Dead (the first book in a young adult horror series co-written with Araminta Star Matthews), Wind Up Hearts (a romance novella with a hint of steampunk), Forever Zombie (a collection of short stories), Write of the Living Dead (a highly-praised writing guide written with Araminta Star Matthews and Rachel Lee) and Return of the Scream Queen (co-authored with Michael McCarty and Linnea Quigley). He is also editor/publisher for Dark Moon Books and Dark Moon Digest. Upcoming titles include Dead Sparrows (a collection of apocalyptic poetry), The Methlands (a horror novel co-written with award-winning author Joe McKinney) and The Misadventures of Hobart Hucklebuck: Pandemonium in Pennywhistle.

Monday, October 13, 2014

REVIEW: The Girl Who Came Back To Life by Craig Staufenberg (3.5 stars out of 5 stars)

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Thanks for joining us today for my review of The Girl Who Came Back to Life by Craig Staufenberg!  I'm excited to share my review of this book with you -- but first, some background information =D


The Girl Who Came Back to Life is a Middle Grade Fantasy (fable/fairytale) and the tour runs October 13-17 with reviews only. Check out the tour page for the full schedule.

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The Girl Who Came Back to Life by Craig Staufenberg

When you die, your spirit wakes in the north, in the City of the Dead. There, you wander the cold until one of your living loved ones finds you, says "Goodbye," and Sends you to the next world. After her parents die, 12-year-old Sophie refuses to release their spirits. Instead, she resolves to travel to the City of the Dead to bring her mother and father’s spirits back home with her. Taking the long pilgrimage north with her gruff & distant grandmother—by train, by foot, by boat; over ruined mountains and plains and oceans—Sophie struggles to return what death stole from her. Yet the journey offers her many hard, unexpected lessons—what to hold on to, when to let go, and who she must truly bring back to life.


Amazon | Goodreads 






 REVIEW: 3.5 stars out of 5
I felt this was a really interesting concept. It's a dark topic but was handled respectfully and in such a way that was very appropriate for the age group.  I'd be interested to see how the target audience perceives the writing, topic, and story.  For me, as an adult, it felt a little young, which for a middle grades book isn't a bad thing, but there's a difference between a middle grades/YA book that anyone of any age can read, and a book in that age range that feels "young." That would really be my only "criticsm" for the book. And feel free to take that with a grain of salt due to the middle grades read by an adult thing ;-) Otherwise, it was very well done with good characters, story line, and ending.   If you read the book and/or have your kids read it, I'd love to hear your thoughts!

About the Author:
Craig Staufenberg is a writer and filmmaker living in NYC.

Giveaway:

3 signed copies of The Girl Who Came Back to Life by Craig Staufenberg (US)

3 ebook copies of The Girl Who Came Back to Life (INT)